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Global coronavirus cases surpass 5 million

Global coronavirus cases surpass 5 million

According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University, more than five million people worldwide have been affirmed to have the coronavirus disease.

At least 5,001,494 cases, including 328,227 deaths, have now been recorded. Europe has been the hardest hit continent with almost 2 million cases and 169,880 deaths, while the United States has more than 1.5 million cases and over 93,000 deaths.

It represents a new phase in the virus’s spread, which was initially topped in China in February before large-scale outbreaks happened in Europe and the United States.

The first 41 cases of coronavirus were verified in Wuhan, China, on January 10, and it took the world until April 1 to reach its first million cases. According to a Reuters tally, about 1 million new cases are recorded every two weeks.

Global coronavirus cases surpass 5 million
Islamic health unit personnel wearing protective gear stand near ambulances as part of preparation to help tackling the coronavirus outbreak in Beirut’s southern suburbs. Image Source: Reuters

At more than 5 million cases, the virus has affected more people in under six months than the yearly total of severe flu cases, which the World Health Organization counts is about 3 million to 5 million globally.

The pandemic has claimed over 326,000 lives, though the actual number is believed to be higher as testing is yet limited, and many nations do not involve fatalities outside of hospitals. Over half of the total deaths have been reported in Europe.

However, a new phase in the virus’s spread has happened within the past week, as Latin America recently passed the U.S. and Europe to have the most vital portion of new cases every day.

Brazil, South America’s most populated country, lately exceeded Germany, France, and the United Kingdom to become the third-largest outbreak in the world, behind only the U.S. and Russia, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. They presently have more than 291,579 confirmed coronavirus cases and at least 18,859 fatalities from the disease.

Global coronavirus cases surpass 5 million
Beds are prepared for coronavirus patients at a military hospital set up at the IFEMA conference centre in Madrid, Spain. Source: Reuters

The U.K. has the second-highest death toll with 35,786, followed closely by Italy with 32,330. The statistics serve only a portion of the accurate total of cases, with many nations testing only the most severe diseases.

China, ground zero of the virus, has recorded more than 84,000 cases and 79,310 recoveries. The country’s death toll reaches 4,638. The hardly changing figures remain to raise objections in and outside China.

Overall, the virus has spread to 188 countries since it first appeared. Despite the increasing number of cases, most who catch the virus undergoes mild symptoms before starting a recovery.

Global coronavirus cases surpass 5 million
A patient, infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is carried on a stretcher into a Caiman helicopter from the French army during transfer operations from Strasbourg to Germany and Switzerland. Source: Reuters

Top 20 Countries with Confirmed COVID-19 Cases

United States – 1,541,110 cases, 92,712 deaths

Russia – 308,705 cases, 2,972 deaths

Brazil – 271,628 cases, 17,971 deaths

United Kingdom – 250,141 cases, 35,785 deaths

Spain – 232,555 cases, 27,888 deaths

Italy – 227,364 cases, 32,330 deaths

France – 181,700 cases, 28,135 deaths

Germany – 178,170 cases, 8,144 deaths

Turkey – 152,587 cases, 4,222 deaths

Iran – 126,949 cases, 7,183 deaths

India – 112,012 cases, 3,434 deaths

Peru – 99,483 cases, 2,914 deaths

China – 84,063 cases, 4,638 deaths

Canada – 81,194 cases, 6,106 deaths

Saudi Arabia – 62,545 cases, 339 deaths

Belgium – 55,983 cases, 9,150 deaths

Mexico – 54,346 cases, 5,666 deaths

Chile – 53,617 cases, 544 deaths

Pakistan – 46,768 cases, 1005 deaths

Netherlands – 44,647 cases, 5,767 deaths

Tags : coronavirus diseaseCOVID-19Global PandemicVirus Outbreak

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